Morganite

History

Discovered in Madagascar in 1910, morganite was named in honor of millionaire banker and mineral collector John Pierpont Morgan. Morganite is said to be the gemstone of the universal heart and is believed to nurture feelings of love and tenderness in a relationship. It is also thought to enhance communications skills and provide focus during times of stress.

Color

Morganite ranges in hue from soft pink to peach to violet‐pink, with soft peach‐pink being the most common. Morganite is also dichroic which means you will see more than one color if you view it from different angles.

Gem Family

Morganite is a member of the beryl family.

Hardness

Morganite is rated at a 7.5‐8.0 on the Mohs scale, and is perfect for everyday wear. Morganite is a popular engagement ring gemstone, and pairs beautifully with diamonds.

Treatments

Morganite is occasionally heat treated to improve its pink color and reducing orange tint.

Care

Morganite should be stored separately to keep from scratching or being scratched. Store it in a lined box or a soft pouch. Avoid steam or ultrasonic cleaners, and keep your morganite sparkling by cleaning it under warm running water with a mild soap. Dry with a soft, lint‐free cloth.