Latin for "sea water," the aquamarine is known for its striking ice‐blue color. Aquamarine has been mined and worn for thousands of years. Medieval sages suggested that water touched by aquamarine could cure a host of illnesses, including those affecting the eyes and lungs. The gem is also thought to bring foresight to its wearer.


Aquamarine is a dichroic gemstone which means it appears blue or colorless depending on what angle it is at viewed when rotated. It can range from greenish‐blue to blue‐green.

Gem Family

Aquamarine is a member of the beryl family.


Aquamarine rates a 7.5‐8.0 on the Mohs scale, making it durable enough for everyday wear.


Occasionally aquamarines are heat‐treated to remove any yellowish tones.


Aquamarine is the traditional birthstone for those born in March.


Store aquamarine away from other gemstones to keep them from scratching or being scratched. To clean aquamarine, rinse it thoroughly under warm running water and dry with a soft lint‐free cloth. Ultrasonic and steam cleaning is usually safe.